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MYTHS VS FACTS

Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors.

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.

Yes. Vaccines are available in California for anyone ages 5 years or older who wants one. Vaccines have been tested in more than 40,000 volunteers, having only mild symptoms, very similar to our flu vaccine. The FDA will continue to monitor closely any change in side effects or recommendations. At this moment, with the information that we have, the vaccines have been evaluated and can start protecting us and our community against COVID-19. For the J&J vaccine, women younger than 50 years old should be aware of the rare risk of blood clots with low platelets after vaccination.

Yes. Vaccines are available in California for anyone age 12 years or older who wants one. This will expand to younger children once the FDA/CDC approves them.

No. None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before.

Yes. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Yes. Vaccinated people could still carry and spread the virus therefore should continue to wear masks, practice frequent hand washing, and socially distance until a majority of the population is vaccinated.

Nothing. The COVID-19 vaccine is completely free and accessible for everyone. Call (855) YA-ANDALE | (855) 922-6325 to schedule an appointment today.

No. Vaccines are available in California for anyone age 12 years or older who wants one. This will expand to younger children once the FDA/CDC approves them.

No. You will not be asked about your citizenship when getting your vaccine.

Yes. Having at least one dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines provides limited protection, but only fully vaccinated individuals are well protected from the Delta variant. You are not fully vaccinated until two weeks after your last shot.

Visit the CDC website to learn more about these new variants. It is normal for a virus to mutate and change over time. Sometimes these new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, new variants emerge and stay. New variants and strains of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States, United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil. So far, studies suggest that the COVID-19 vaccine is effective in protecting you from these new variants. Scientists and doctors continue to study the effects. Continue physical distancing, wearing masks, practicing hand hygiene, and isolation and quarantining when exposed to COVID-19, is essential to limit the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 and protect public health.

No. COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

No. There is no information at this moment that would correlate the risk of infertility and COVID-19. Please refer to the CDC website for more information. While the vaccine trial enrollment excluded pregnant individuals, several people got pregnant during the trial. We do not have any other vaccines either that make you infertile.

Yes. If you are trying to become pregnant now or want to get pregnant in the future, you may get a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available to you. There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that female or male fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

No. Your menstrual cycle cannot be affected by being near someone who received a COVID-19 vaccine. Many things can affect menstrual cycles, including stress, changes in your schedule, problems with sleep, and changes in diet or exercise. Infections may also affect menstrual cycles.

At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long.

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​ If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection again.

No. The federal government does not mandate (require) vaccination for people. Additionally, CDC does not maintain or monitor a person’s vaccination records. Whether a state or local government or employer, for example, can require or mandate COVID-19 vaccination is a matter of state or other applicable law

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic: cover your mouth and nose with a mask, wash hands often, and stay at least six feet away from others.

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic: cover your mouth and nose with a mask, wash hands often, and stay at least six feet away from others. Visit the CDC website for the recent mask guidelines.

Everyone should continue to follow local and state rules and regulations, which may or may not have changed since the CDC released new recommendations. In addition, everyone should comply with the practices of businesses that continue to require masks. This is particularly important in indoor settings where vaccinated and unvaccinated people may interact. While many local and state governments, workplaces, and businesses updated their mask policies since the CDC issued its new recommendations, others have not, and others still may wait for additional guidance from the CDC.

The guidance on wearing masks has not changed for unvaccinated people or partially vaccinated people, who should continue to wear a mask and maintain social distance, particularly when indoors or in crowded outdoor settings. To protect their friends, family, and community, unvaccinated people age two and older should wear a well-fitted mask in public settings and when around people who don’t live in their household. Unvaccinated people do not need to wear a mask outdoors if they practice social distancing or when they are at small outdoor gatherings where all other guests are fully vaccinated. You are not fully vaccinated until two weeks have passed since your second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine or since your one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

If you are fully vaccinated — which means two weeks have passed since your second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine or since your one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine — you have a very low risk of contracting COVID-19 or spreading it to others. However, vaccinated people should continue to follow local and state regulations, including individual business (such as retail stores and restaurants) and workplace requirements, which may differ from CDC guidance depending on local scenarios and transmission rates.

While COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective, no vaccine provides 100% immunity. Even with new and evolving guidance, fully vaccinated individuals may make the personal decision to continue to wear a mask based on their own risk assessment and preference. Those with certain medical conditions such as immuno-suppression should consult their physicians regarding the continuation of mask-wearing and other protective measures.

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19. It is important to understand that even if we get the vaccine (COVID-19, influenza or others) we should still try to avoid exposure. This is key to diminishing the virus’ ability to live in us (and not getting us sick) and transfer it to someone else.

The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines require two shots. The first shot starts building protection. A second shot a few weeks later (known as a booster) is needed to create the most protection the vaccine has to offer. Both shots are needed to be fully effective. The J&J vaccine only requires one shot.

Yes. The CDC states that additional vaccines (including childhood immunizations and the flu vaccines) may be given the same day or within 14 days of the COVID-19 vaccine.

At this moment, there is no specific contraindication against getting the vaccine. Please refer to the CDC website.

If you suffer from allergies, the CDC advises that you consult your doctor before getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Visit the CDC website for more information.

Per the CDC, COVID-19 vaccines may be administered to most people with underlying medical conditions. This information aims to help people in the following groups make an informed decision about receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.

Prior to FDA approval, the COVID-19 vaccines were evaluated in many thousands of patients first by conducting clinical trials. Clinical trials are closely monitored research programs conducted with patients to see if a new drug or medical treatment is effective. The trials were conducted according to strict standards set forth by the FDA in June 2020. The Food and Drug Administration (or FDA) provided an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to use the vaccines because the research showed the vaccines are highly effective in preventing COVID-19 in adults. The research findings in the COVID-19 vaccine trials were proven to have minimal side effects and be highly effective in preventing COVID-19 in adults.

The CDC and FDA have recommended that use of Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine resume in the United States, effective April 23, 2021. However, women younger than 50 years old should especially be aware of the rare risk of blood clots with low platelets after vaccination, and that other COVID-19 vaccines are available where this risk has not been seen. If you received a J&J/Janssen vaccine, here is what you need to know. Read the CDC/FDA statement.

After receiving the Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, monitor for any of the following symptoms between four to 28 days after being vaccinated:

  • Severe or persistent headache
  • Severe or persistent blurry vision
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Persistent abdominal pain
  • New severe swelling, pain, or color change of the arm or leg
  • Abnormal bruising, reddish or purple spots or blood blisters under the skin

Call (855) YA-ANDALE / (855) 922-6325 for more information.

Persons who have received dermal fillers may develop swelling at or near the filler injection site. After receiving the Moderna or Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines, contact your medical provider if swelling develops at or near the filler injection site, usually in the face or lips.

The CDC and FDA encourage the public to report possible side effects (called adverse events) to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). This national system collects these data to look for adverse events that are unexpected, appear to happen more often than expected, or have unusual patterns of occurrence. 

Learn about the difference between a vaccine side effect and an adverse event. Reports to VAERS help CDC monitor the safety of vaccines. Safety is a top priority. Health care providers will be required to report certain adverse events following vaccination to VAERS. Health care providers also have to adhere to any revised safety reporting requirements according to FDA’s conditions of authorized use throughout the duration of any Emergency Use Authorization; these requirements would be posted on the FDA’s website.

CDC is also implementing a new smartphone-based tool called v-safe to check-in on people’s health after they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. When you receive your vaccine, you should also receive a v-safe information sheet telling you how to enroll in v-safe. If you enroll, you will receive regular text messages directing you to surveys where you can report any problems or adverse reactions you have after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.

Not everyone will experience side effects after the vaccine. If you have pain or discomfort, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or analgesics.

Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, and pericarditis is inflammation of the outer lining of the heart. The symptoms are chest pain, shortness of breath, or an abnormal heartbeat (fast, fluttering, or pounding). There have been some cases of males 16 and older getting myocarditis and pericarditis after their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. Most patients who received care quickly felt better.

Guillain Barré syndrome is a neurological disorder that damages nerve cells and causes muscle weakness in some people who have received the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine. Out of the 12.8 million people who have received the Janssen vaccine, there have only been 100 people suspected of getting Guillain Barre Syndrome.